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Spring
2018
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If You Have Been Assaulted

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If you are in danger, call 911 immediately

What happened is not your fault. You did NOT cause the assault. You did not deserve it.

You have the right to be believed and to receive appropriate medical, emotional, and legal support if you choose such options.

What to do:

  • Get to a safe place. Try not to change anything at the location of the attack.
  • Call a friend or family member to be with you.
  • Try not to eat, drink, shower, brush your teeth, go to the bathroom, change your clothing, etc. These behaviors may inadvertently alter evidence. If you have done any of these things, there may still be evidence remaining.
  • Consider getting an examination (sexual assault forensic medical exam) to collect legal evidence of your assault. If you are unsure if you want a sexual assault forensic medical exam or if you want to learn more about it, contact the CARE Office, College Health Services, the College Title IX office, or your local Rape Crisis Center for assistance.
  • If you decide to have an exam: You can change your clothing, or not. If you choose to change place the clothing you were wearing during your assault (including any undergarments) into a paper bag (if possible, do not use a plastic bag). Give the bag to law enforcement or bring it with you when you go to the hospital. If you don't want to file a police report; consider receiving medical attention at the local hospital where you can have a medical evaluation, be tested for sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy, and receive medications to prevent pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections.
  • You have the option to have an evidentiary exam even if you choose not to report to law enforcement. You can call your local Rape Crisis Center directly to request such an exam. It is called a VAWA exam and is funded by the Violence Against Women Act. VAWA exams are available to people of all genders. It is available to survivors over the age of 18. If you are under 18, medical staff are mandated to report to law enforcement.
  • You have a legal right to a state-certified Sexual Assault Response Team Advocate (SART) from your local Rape Crisis Center present during your exam to provide emotional support; to advocate on your behalf to medical personnel, law enforcement, and family/friends; to assist with crisis intervention services and make referrals; as well as assist you in any other needs you may have.
  • Contact the Title IX CARE Office where professional counselors can explain your reporting options and can help you connect to on and off campus resources. Ask a friend or family member to call if you’re unable to do so yourself.What happened is not your fault. You did NOT cause the assault, and no matter what happened, you did not deserve it.

What are my Rights?

  • You have the right to be believed
  • You have the right to be given the same credibility as any other crime victim
  • You have the right to seek and receive help
  • You have the right to courteous, efficient treatment
  • You have the right to be treated with dignity and respect, without prejudice against race, class, lifestyle, age, gender, religion, sexual orientation, or occupation
  • You have the right to accurate information, presented in a way that you understand
  • You have the right to ask questions
  • You have the right to make your own decisions
  • You have the right to change your mind
  • You have the right to get help and support from others. You have the right to heal
  • Survivors shall be notified of their options to notify law enforcement
  • Accuser and accused must have the same opportunity to have others present
  • Both parties shall be informed of the outcome of any disciplinary proceeding
  • Survivors shall be notified of counseling services
  • Survivors shall be notified of options for changing academic and living situations

From the Federal Campus Sexual Assault Victim’s Bill of Rights (1992)

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